Today I’m happy to have talked to Kay Bratt, the author of The Palest Ink.  Kay Bratt is a child advocate and author of the series Tales of the Scavenger’s Daughters and the acclaimed memoir of the years she spent working in Chinese orphanages, Silent Tears: A Journey of Hope in a Chinese Orphanage. After living in China for several years, Bratt now resides in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains in South Carolina with her husband, daughter, dog, and cat. Learn more about her memoir and works of fiction at www.kaybratt.com. Be sure to read all the way …
Today’s guest post was submitted by Barbie Jazz.  The future is here! A restaurant in downtown Harbin employs around 20 robots instead of humans to take orders, cook, serve, and entertain guests. The restaurant opened back in June 2012 and remains a popular tourist spot in Heilongjiang. As soon as guests walk in, a front-of-the-house robot warmly greets them with, “Earth person, hello! Welcome to Robot Restaurant!” Then, they are guided to an empty table. After browsing the menu, guests can place their orders through the robots, which are then relayed to robot chefs who are able to consistently cook …
Today’s guest post was submitted by Karen. I love staying in inexpensive hostels when traveling around China. This new capsule hotel might be worth checking out if you ever visit Xi’an.  Taking up an entire floor of a commercial center near Xi’An’s train station is China’s first, fully-functional capsule hotel. Capsule hotels were popularized by Japan, and China’s construction of the same concept is a nod to the Japanese culture that’s popular among the Chinese youth. Each capsule in the Xi’an Youth Capsule Hotel is 1.25 meters high, 1.2 meters wide, and 2.1 meters long. For about $10 a night, …
While watching the American TV show “How I Met Your Mother,” I asked my mom how she met my father. “Why do you want to know that? It is not romantic at all,” she asked. “Oh, come on, I just want to hear your story,” I replied. “I grew up in a family without much love, especially our father’s love,” she began. “I was the 4th daughter in my family, the child they never wanted. You can tell that from my name. My oldest sister was named Jia Lian, which means “family union;” my second sister was named “Jia Pin,” …
Today’s guest post comes from David at Photography Dock. I am sure all expats want to take the best and most striking pictures of their travels abroad, so I was thrilled when David offered to do this guest post on taking street shots in China. I hope you will find it as educational as I did.  Having lived in China for more than 5 years now, I’ve decided to embark upon a journey of sharing what has most impressed me from this fascinating country. I’ll be covering the areas that I think matter most, and of course include illustrations and …
Recently, a man in Hubei was sentenced to life in prison for causing the deaths of four people when he crashed into a group of pedestrians after suffering from an epileptic seizure. Most of the comments in response to the article have centered around how stupid it was of the man to keep his illness secret and keep driving. Of course, the man should not have been driving, but I thought it was important to have a discussion about why someone in China would feel the need to keep an illness like this secret. I thought it was best to …
I had been excited for over 6 months about my trip to America since my godparents told me they were going to take me there for Chinese New Year, but from the very beginning, I barely knew anything about our plans. My mom decided this would be a surprise trip for me and she did a good job. So most days started like this: “Zoe, are you ready to go? Are you excited?” “Yes, yes, I am. But where are we going?” My dad even messaged me before my trip to Shenzhen. He told me they had secret plans for …
One of the hardest things about my job is editing the “opinion” page of the paper. We have a lot of freedom on that page and can pretty much publish anything we want, but the same two old Chinese men write almost every week. There is the “China is great at all the things” guy and “America sucks except when Japan sucks more” guy. It has been my personal mission to increase diversity on the opinion page by seeking out more diverse writers and more diverse topics, but it has been an uphill battle. One of our teen writers, a …
While it’s easy to find articles about “gifts to bring with you to China” or “gift giving in China,” I’ve never seen anyone talk about what to do if you want to send a gift to someone in China from America or Europe. In today’s guest post, Betsy McLeod talks about this interesting situation. ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Whether it’s Christmas, Chinese New Year, an anniversary, or just because, the digital age has made it easier than ever to send gifts to China. Gift-giving plays an integral part of Chinese culture, signifying well-wishing, respect and sincerity. Remember these tips the next time you …
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